The doll in the storage room

This is a real ghost story.

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Books related to The doll in the storage room


The Mystery of the Sea

"To win the mystery o' the sea, "An' learn the secrets that there be, "Gather in ane these weirds three: "A gowden moon on a flowin' tide; "An' Lammas floods for the spell to bide; "An' a gowden mon wi death for his bride."

The Lady of the Shroud

A strange story comes from the Adriatic. It appears that on the night of the 9th, as the Italia Steamship Company's vessel "Victorine" was passing a little before midnight the point known as "the Spear of Ivan," on the coast of the Blue Mountains, the attention of the Captain, then on the bridge, was called by the look-out man to a tiny floating light close inshore. It is the custom of some South-going ships to run close to the Spear of Ivan in fine weather, as the water is deep, and there is no settled current; also there are no outlying rocks. Indeed, some years ago the local steamers had become accustomed to hug the shore here so closely that an intimation was sent from Lloyd's that any mischance under the circumstances would not be included in ordinary sea risks. Captain Mirolani is one of those who insist on a wholesome distance from the promontory being kept;

The Fate of Fenella

The publishers claim with no little satisfaction that in this book they offer the reading public a genuine novelty. The idea of a novel written by twenty-four popular writers is certainly an original one. The ladies and gentlemen who have written "The Fate of Fenella" have done their work quite independently of each other. There has been collaboration but not consultation. As each one wrote a chapter it was passed on to the next, and so on until it reached the hands of Mr. F. Anstey, whose peculiar and delightful humor made him a fitting choice for bringing the story to a satisfactory close. NEW YORK CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY 104 & 106 Fourth Avenue

The Lair of the White Worm

Also known as The Garden of Evil, is a horror novel. It was originally published in 1911, the year before Stoker's death. In 1925, it was abridged from forty chapters, down to twenty-eight, with editorial revisions. It was later adapted into a film in 1988 by Ken Russell. The plot focuses on Adam Salton, originally from Australia, who is contacted by his grand-uncle, Richard Salton, in 1860 England for the purpose of establishing a relationship between these last two members of the family. His grand-uncle wants to make Adam his heir. Adam travels to Richard Salton's house in Mercia, Lesser Hill, and quickly finds himself in the centre of mysterious and inexplicable occurrences

An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

"An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" or "A Dead Man's Dream" is a short story by American author Ambrose Bierce. The story, which is set during the Civil War, is famous for its irregular time sequence and twist ending. Bierce's abandonment of strict linear narration in favor of the internal mind of the protagonist is considered an early example of experimentation with stream of consciousness. It is Bierce's most anthologized story.

The damned thing

"The Damned Thing" is a short story written by Ambrose Bierce. This story focuses on how the human race takes their views of nature for granted, and how there may be things in the natural world that the human eye cannot see or the human ear cannot hear.

A Dream of Red Hands

"A Dream of Red Hands" is a short story by Bram Stoker. It was first published in the July 11, 1894 issue of The Sketch: A Journal of Art and Actuality, London.

Carmilla

Carmilla is a Gothic novella by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu and one of the early works of vampire fiction. It was first published in 1871 as a serial narrative in The Dark Blue. It tells the story of a young woman's susceptibility to the attentions of a female vampire named Carmilla. It predates Bram Stoker's Dracula by 26 years. The story has been adapted many times in film and other media.

The Great God Pan

The Great God Pan is a novella written by Arthur Machen. On publication it was widely denounced by the press as degenerate and horrific because of its decadent style and sexual content, although it has since garnered a reputation as a classic of horror. Machen’s story was only one of many at the time to focus on the Greek God Pan as a useful symbol for the power of nature and paganism. The title was possibly inspired by the poem "A Musical Instrument" published in 1862 by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, in which the first line of every stanza ends "... the great god Pan."

The Dreams in the Witch House

"The Dreams in the Witch House" is a horror short story by American writer H. P. Lovecraft, part of the Cthulhu Mythos cycle. Written in January/February 1932 and first published in the July 1933 issue of Weird Tales.

The doll in the storage room

This is a real ghost story.