Total books found : 228
Hector Servadac: Part I

by Jules Verne, translated by Ellen E. Frewer

Hector Servadac: Part II

by Jules Verne, translated by Ellen E. Frewer

Michael Strogoff: Book II

Michael Strogoff: The Courier of the Czar (French: Michel Strogoff) is a novel written by Jules Verne in 1876. It is considered one of Verne's best books by critics. Unlike some of Verne's other famous novels, it is not science fiction

Michael Strogoff: Book I

Michael Strogoff: The Courier of the Czar (French: Michel Strogoff) is a novel written by Jules Verne in 1876. It is considered one of Verne's best books by critics. Unlike some of Verne's other famous novels, it is not science fiction

The Survivors of the Chancellor

The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger (Le Chancellor: Journal du passager J.-R. Kazallon) is an 1875 novel written by Jules Verne about the final voyage of a British sailing vessel, the Chancellor, told from the perspective of one of its passengers (in the form of a diary).

The Mysterious Island: Part III

The Mysterious Island is a French novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. The original edition, by Hetzel, contains a number of illustrations by Jules Férat. The novel is a sequel to Verne's famous Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and In Search of the Castaways, though thematically it is vastly different from those books. This is Part III: The Secret of the Island

The Mysterious Island: Part II

The Mysterious Island is a French novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. The original edition, by Hetzel, contains a number of illustrations by Jules Férat. The novel is a sequel to Verne's famous Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and In Search of the Castaways, though thematically it is vastly different from those books. This is Part II: Abandoned

The Mysterious Island: Part I

The Mysterious Island is a French novel by Jules Verne, published in 1874. The original edition, by Hetzel, contains a number of illustrations by Jules Férat. The novel is a sequel to Verne's famous Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and In Search of the Castaways, though thematically it is vastly different from those books. This is Part I: Shipwrecked in the Air

A Floating City

A Floating City is an adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne first published in 1871. It tells of a woman who, on board the ship Great Eastern with her husband, finds that the man she loves is also on board.

The Fate of Fenella

The publishers claim with no little satisfaction that in this book they offer the reading public a genuine novelty. The idea of a novel written by twenty-four popular writers is certainly an original one. The ladies and gentlemen who have written "The Fate of Fenella" have done their work quite independently of each other. There has been collaboration but not consultation. As each one wrote a chapter it was passed on to the next, and so on until it reached the hands of Mr. F. Anstey, whose peculiar and delightful humor made him a fitting choice for bringing the story to a satisfactory close. NEW YORK CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY 104 & 106 Fourth Avenue

The Lair of the White Worm

Also known as The Garden of Evil, is a horror novel. It was originally published in 1911, the year before Stoker's death. In 1925, it was abridged from forty chapters, down to twenty-eight, with editorial revisions. It was later adapted into a film in 1988 by Ken Russell. The plot focuses on Adam Salton, originally from Australia, who is contacted by his grand-uncle, Richard Salton, in 1860 England for the purpose of establishing a relationship between these last two members of the family. His grand-uncle wants to make Adam his heir. Adam travels to Richard Salton's house in Mercia, Lesser Hill, and quickly finds himself in the centre of mysterious and inexplicable occurrences

The Lady of the Shroud

A strange story comes from the Adriatic. It appears that on the night of the 9th, as the Italia Steamship Company's vessel "Victorine" was passing a little before midnight the point known as "the Spear of Ivan," on the coast of the Blue Mountains, the attention of the Captain, then on the bridge, was called by the look-out man to a tiny floating light close inshore. It is the custom of some South-going ships to run close to the Spear of Ivan in fine weather, as the water is deep, and there is no settled current; also there are no outlying rocks. Indeed, some years ago the local steamers had become accustomed to hug the shore here so closely that an intimation was sent from Lloyd's that any mischance under the circumstances would not be included in ordinary sea risks. Captain Mirolani is one of those who insist on a wholesome distance from the promontory being kept;

The Mystery of the Sea

"To win the mystery o' the sea, "An' learn the secrets that there be, "Gather in ane these weirds three: "A gowden moon on a flowin' tide; "An' Lammas floods for the spell to bide; "An' a gowden mon wi death for his bride."

Around the World in Eighty Days

This is one the most popular book in history. Considered a classic tale of adventure which takes a men across the globe in 80 days to win a bet. From Africa to China and from London to India this is an adventure one of its kind.

The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in Southern Africa

This is a translation of Verne's Aventures de trois Russes et de trois Anglais dans l’Afrique australe. The full English title used is Meridiana: The Adventures of Three Englishmen and Three Russians in South Africa. The translation was first published by Sampson Low, London, 1872.

Around the Moon

Jules Verne's sequel to From the Earth to the Moon, is a science fiction novel continuing the trip to the moon which left the reader in suspense after the previous novel.

20,000 Leagues Under the Seas

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas: A World Tour Underwater is a classic science fiction adventure novel by French writer Jules Verne. The novel was originally serialized from March 1869 through June 1870 in Pierre-Jules Hetzel's fortnightly periodical, the Magasin d'éducation et de récréation

In Search of the Castaways

In Search of the Castaways (original title Les Enfants du capitaine Grant, "The Children of Captain Grant") is a science fiction novel by the French writer Jules Verne, published in 1867-1868. The original edition, by Hetzel, contains a number of illustrations by Edouard Riou.

From the Earth to the Moon

From the Earth to the Moon is a humorous science fantasy story written in 1865 by Jules Verne and is one of the earliest entries in that genre. It tells the story of three well-to-do members of a post-American Civil War gun club who build an enormous sky-facing columbiad and ride a spaceship fired from it to the moon. The actual trip into space is covered in Around the Moon, the 1870 novel that Verne wrote following 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.

The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras

The Adventures of Captain Hatteras (French: Voyages et aventures du capitaine Hatteras) is an adventure novel by Jules Verne. The novel was published for the first time in 1864. The definitive version from 1866 was included into Voyages Extraordinaires series (The Extraordinary Voyages).

Five Weeks in a Balloon

Documentation for the TextInfo template.information about this edition. Sister Projects.sister projects: Wikidata item. Five Weeks in a Balloon, or, Journeys and Discoveries in Africa by Three Englishmen is an 1863 novel by Jules Verne. It is the first Verne novel in which he perfected the "ingredients" of his later work, skillfully mixing a plot full of adventure and twists that hold the reader's interest with passages of technical, geographic, and historic description. The book gives readers a glimpse of the exploration of Africa, which was still not completely known to Europeans of the time, with explorers traveling all over the continent in search of its secrets.

The Shadow Out of Time

The Shadow Out of Time is a novella by American horror fiction writer H. P. Lovecraft. Written between November 1934 and February 1935, it was first published in the June 1936 issue of Astounding Stories. The story describes time and space travel by mind transfer. The premise is that a person in a given place and time can switch bodies with someone who is elsewhere or elsewhen. Other writers have re-used this concept in later works, such as drinking tea from Red Forest leaves in the 12 Monkeys (TV series) and long-range communication stones in the Stargate SG-1 television series. As with other Lovecraftian works, this story features blatantly alien beings that aren't simply variations on humans or other familiar terrestrial animals.

Journey into the Interior of the Earth

Journey to the Center of the Earth is an 1864 science fiction novel by Jules Verne. The story involves German professor Otto Lidenbrock who believes there are volcanic tubes going toward the centre of the Earth.

The Man

The Victorian Era, the reign of Queen Victoria from her coronation on 20 June 1837 to her death on 22 January 1901, is known as a long period of peace, prosperity and national pride for the British Empire. It was a bold transition from the Georgian era, largely defined by logic, rationalism and a progression towards romanticism and mysticism in religion, societal values and the arts. In international relations, the Georgian era was widely regarded as a period of peace and Britain involved themselves in little external conflict. However, within the American colonies there was much unrest. In British domestic relations, the political agenda became increasingly liberal and was marked by shifts toward political, industrial and social reform. During the Victorian era, Britain experienced an unprecedented economic and population growth.

The Jewel of Seven Stars

Sister Projects.sister projects: Wikipedia article, quotes, Wikidata item. The Jewel of Seven Stars (also published under the name The Jewel of the Seven Stars) is a horror novel by Bram Stoker first published in 1903. The story is about an archaeologist's plot to revive Queen Tera, an ancient Egyptian mummy.